Man used code words to distribute child porn to Mass. inmate

“Antiques” meant child pornography; “puppies” meant “children.”


Amy Renee Leiker
The Wichita Eagle

BOSTON — Christopher Saemisch was already a convicted sex offender in Kansas when he started sharing child pornography with a federal inmate in Massachusetts. He told the inmate he liked viewing and keeping the explicit materials and desired traveling to Europe so he could have sex with minors. He even boasted about how he had access to children through his new babysitting job.

When Saemisch and the inmate talked about collecting and sharing child porn, they spoke in code. “Antiques” meant child pornography. “Puppies” meant “children.”

Eventually, the inmate ratted Saemisch out.

On Tuesday, a federal jury in Boston convicted Saemisch, 61, of distributing child pornography to that federal inmate, according to a news release from the Department of Justice. Evidence presented during his five-day trial showed Saemisch was living in Kansas City when in April 2016 the inmate told federal agents about their communications.

The next month, on May 3, 2016, the undercover agents posed as the inmate and started talking to Saemisch directly over messaging apps and the web. As they spoke, Saemisch told the agents to set up accounts so they could receive and exchange pornography images of children. He also sent the agents porn he kept on file storage sites.

Authorities arrested him three days later — on May 6, 2016 — while he was attending an event at a nudist campsite, according to the Department of Justice news release.

Saemisch has a 1999 conviction in Kansas for aggravated incident liberties with a child younger than 14. In 1997, he was convicted in federal court for a several child sex crimes, including sexual exploitation and sending and receiving child porn.

Because he has prior child exploitation convictions, Saemisch faces 15 to 40 years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine when he is sentenced on July 9 by U.S. District Court Judge George A. O’Toole Jr. in the District of Massachusetts. Saemisch is also subject to 5 years to lifetime supervision after he’s served his prison sentence, according to the Department of Justice news release.

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©2019 The Wichita Eagle (Wichita, Kan.)

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

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